Central America and Mexico

Since making our first loan to a coffee cooperative in Guatemala in 1999, we continue to invest in small and growing agricultural enterprises across the region.

From well-established cooperatives to early-stage businesses looking to grow, the region is full of enterprises poised to drive impact for smallholder farmers. This support is increasingly urgent, as the region battles natural disasters and other impacts of climate change. With offices in Costa Rica, Mexico, and Nicaragua, we use innovative funding mechanisms to unlock the impact potential of coffee, cocoa, and honey enterprises.


In this region we currently work in Costa Rica, Guatemala, Honduras, Mexico, and Nicaragua.

Stories of Impact


Unlocking Opportunity for Those Who Need It Most

Two billion. That’s the number of people in rural communities who are struggling to survive on less than $2 per day. Many of them are farming to feed the rest of the world, yet they aren’t getting enough to eat. Many live hundreds of miles from accessible markets, without the roads to reach them. With few choices, they’re forced to sell their hard-earned crops at rock-bottom prices. But there’s a way out of this cycle of grinding poverty.

Organic Agriculture: How This Costa Rican Co-op is Growing a Better Future for Its Farmers

In Walter Elizondo Naranjo’s office in San Antonio, Costa Rica, hangs a large banner with pictures of pineapple, bananas, and oranges. 100% orgánico, the banner proudly states. Looking at the banner, Walter grins broadly. “This is COOPEASSA.”

What’s the Buzz? How Rural Businesses Face the Global Bee Crisis Head-on

Lately, there’s been a lot of buzz about bees—and not all of it’s good. Around the world, honeybees are dying out. But what does this really mean—and how are agricultural businesses addressing this crisis?

In This Corner of Honduras, “Agriculture” Isn’t a Dirty Word

For young people in many farming communities, agriculture has become a dirty word. But in Ocotepeque, Honduras, ag is cool.

Internal Credit Funds: Extending Credit Where it’s Needed Most

Members of APROCASSI, a coffee cooperative in Peru, line up to apply for credit from the cooperative's internal credit fund. When asked about the effect that a rural business’ internal credit fund has on farmers, Root Capital advisor Fany Murillo answers with a single word: “epic.”

Detrás del escenario con el equipo de Asesoría de Root Capital

Lula Pérez, asesora de Root Capital. En diciembre del 2016, con la aproximación del cierre de la Iniciativa para la Resiliencia de los Productores de Café (CFRI, por sus siglas en inglés), aprovechamos la oportunidad para celebrar los resultados de este esfuerzo polifacético de canalizar capital y capacitación a empresas asociativas productoras de café en la lucha contra el brote de la roya en América Latina.